Scientific Program

Day 1 :

  • Nursing Education | Public Health Care | Nursing Care | Critical Care Nursing
Location: London, UK

Session Introduction

Nilgun Kuru

Hacettepe University, Turkey

Title: The Effect of Laughter Therapy on The Quality of Life of Nursing Home Residents
Speaker
Biography:

Nilgün Kuru is Assistant Professor at Faculty of Nursing, Hacettepe University in Turkey.  Her Phd Thesis” The Effect of Laughter Therapy on the Quality of Life of Nursing Home Residents”. She is interested in older adults health, especially in the realm of quality of life, life satisfaction of older adults.

 

Abstract:

Aims and objectives:To evaluate the effect of Laughter therapy on the quality of life of nursing home residents. Background. By improving the quality of life of residents living in nursing homes and allowing them to have a healthier existence, their lives can be extended. Therefore, interventions impacting the quality of life of older adults are of critical importance. Design. Quasi-experimental design. Method. The study was conducted between 2 March – 25 May 2015. The experimental group was composed of 32 nursing home residents from one nursing home, while the control group consisted of 33 nursing home residents from another nursing home in the capital city of Turkey. Laughter therapy was applied with nursing home residents of the experimental group two days per week (21 sessions in total). A socio-demographic form and the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) were used for data collection. Results. After the laughter therapy intervention, general and subscales (physical functioning, role-physical, bodily pain, general health, vitality, social functioning, role-emotional and spiritual health) quality-of-life scores of residents in the experimental group significantly increased in comparison with the pretest. Conclusion. Laughter therapy improved the quality of life of nursing home residents. Therefore, nursing home management should integrate laughter therapy into health care and laughter therapy should be provided as a routine nursing intervention. Relevance to clinical practice. The results indicated that the laughter therapy programme had a positive effect on the quality of life of nursing home residents. Nurses can use laughter therapy as an intervention to improve quality of life of nursing home residents.

 

 

Speaker
Biography:

I completed Ph.D. program in June, 2016 at the School of Nursing at University of California, San Francisco. The title of my dissertation was “Social Determinants of Health-related Quality of Life in Palestinian Refugees Living Inside and Outside Camps in Jordan”. Two relevant research papers were submitted for publication since my doctoral graduation. The first was published online in May, 2017 and was entitled: “Health-related quality of life of Palestinian refugees inside and outside camps in Jordan”. The second one is still under review and it is entitled: “Depression, Perceived Health and Right-of-Return Hopefulness of Palestinian Refugees”. I plan to continue working with refugees in Jordan and contributing to the understanding of their health and quality of life in the physical, psychological, social, as well as environmental domains over the course of my academic career.

 

Abstract:

Introduction: Social Determinants of Health (SDOH), such as age, gender, income, and educational level, are considered an important indicator of health characteristics and outcomes of individuals, families and communities, regardless of the ethnic, racial or socio-economic backgrounds. The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan has received waves of refugees and asylum seekers all over its relatively-short history. The latest wave of refugees and displaced persons who fled to Jordan is that of several hundreds of thousands of Syrians who fled the devastating and life-threatening consequences of the Syrian crisis since winter, 2011. These Syrian refugees currently reside either inside of designated refugee camps, or outside camps among the host Jordanian urban communities.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Clinical Emergency Nurse - National Health Service MSc Clinical Research in Public Health -UB BSc Nursing - UGR

Abstract:

Reduce mortality in children under 5 years is the goal of control programs for malaria. Understanding the socio-cultural aspects is essential to implement effective low cost solutions. The purpose of this exploratory work by studying the social representations of malaria in Bolondo (a small coastal community in sub-Saharan Africa), have 3 aims: 1- learn the causes of therapeutic delay in case of fever due to malaria in children under 5 years. 2- discuss the role of traditional medicine 3- assess the level of mothers´s empowerment. The data analysis methods developed by triangulation, identifies patterns of behaviour in the primary carers influencing survival. The data comes from a purposeful sample of 23 semi-structured in-depth interviews to mothers who came to the clinic with children under 5 years with fever and diagnosed with positive malaria, 7 key informants, 2 focal discussions and numerous conversations informal interviews, the sample closes with elements saturation. Respondents properly identify malaria symptoms and signs of severe malaria, recognise a therapeutic delay from 2 to 5 days, lists some preventive measures and establish multiple levels of causation that require different types of treatment that includes western and traditional medicine. The study concludes that risk perception influences decision making by primary caregivers, reflecting itself in the therapeutic delay and the choice of itinerary health. Relevant drivers for survival are the level of empowerment of mothers, perceived susceptibility, and risk assessment. The identification of such behavioural patterns allow to design more effective action in terms of public health impact and sustainability.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Peter is currently a PhD candidate in business and health services interdisciplinary study at Fiji National University. He was formerly the senior manager of radiology department at Popondetta General Hospital, Papua New Guinea. He has 15 years of work experiences in the health sector apart from his role as branch president of allied health workers association for 9 years before pursuing his doctoral career.

 

Abstract:

Employee empowerment is a valuable management tool used by organizations to improve and enhance performance. Whilst majority of the empowerment literatures concentrate on linear empowerment approach, the emerging multilevel (cross-level) empowerment has hardly gained research attention so far. Hence, this study used a multilevel model to examine employee empowerment in the health sector in Papua New Guinea and its link with perceived service quality. The study has adopted cross-sectional survey of 327 clinicians including nurses in four major hospitals in the country particularly Port Moresby, Kerema and Popondetta Genera Hospitals including Laloki Psychiatric Hospital between April and May, 2018. Multivariate regression and correlation analyses using EViews (statistical tool) show that structural empowerment and empowering leadership have a statistically significant influence on the employees’ psychology both at the individual and team (unit) levels, and in turn these have a significant influence on perceived service quality. Additional analysis of 22 dimensions of all five study variables (structural empowerment, empowering leadership, unit empowerment, psychological empowerment, and perceived service quality) indicate a generally weak to moderate empowering leadership practice in leading by example, participative decision-making, coaching, informing, and team interactive with an average of 3.5 on a 5-point rating. Furthermore, structural empowerment reveals that hospital employees have limited access to opportunity, information, support, and resources required to perform their roles with an average of 3.3 on a 5-point rating. Also, a reliable workforce was rated 3.7 whilst the appearance of employees and facilities including performance of equipment/materials rated 3.0 on a 5 point scale. The study outcome suggests implications for improvement by adopting multilevel empowerment frameworks to add value to the existing systems particularly within complex and dynamic hospital systems.